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Zdenka Badovinac

Zdenka Badovinac became the director of the Moderna galerija in Ljubljana during the wars for Yugoslav succession. In the two and a half decades since, she has been a powerful voice from the so-called “former East” in articulating a position for artists from post-socialist Europe within the contemporary global art infrastructure, where global most often means taking up models instigated in Western museums and exhibition spaces. In 2006 Badovinac curated the exhibition Interrupted Histories, which foregrounded the work of artists from Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and, in her accompanying catalogue essay she asked, “What are the implications of the absence of systematic historicization in spaces outside, or on the margins of, the West? […] How might the processes of such historicization be accelerated?”

Badovinac is amongst a group of curators and artists in Central and Eastern Europe that have actively been working to resituate and inscribe a history of art that accommodates artistic production in countries like the former Yugoslavia into “larger” art histories, while at the same time maintaining a critical stance towards this process.

In her keynote lecture, Badovinac introduces her concept of the “sustainable museum,” and explores possible translocal approaches to exhibition practice from the so-called periphery, nevertheless situated within the neoliberal global network of art museums and biennials.

This seminar is a part of Multiplying Perspectives, in Practice

Author

Bauhaus in balance 7 john r. harris

Meghan Forbes

Postdoctoral Fellow, Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art The Metropolitan Museum of Art Meghan Forbes is a postdoctoral fellow at the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Previously, she was the... Read more »
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Zdenka Badovinac

Zdenka Badovinac became the director of the Moderna galerija in Ljubljana during the wars for Yugoslav succession. In the two and a half decades since, she has been a powerful voice from the so-called “former East” in articulating a position for artists from post-socialist Europe within the contemporary global art infrastructure, where global most often means taking up models instigated in Western museums and exhibition spaces. In 2006 Badovinac curated the exhibition Interrupted Histories, which foregrounded the work of artists from Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and, in her accompanying catalogue essay she asked, “What are the implications of the absence of systematic historicization in spaces outside, or on the margins of, the West? […] How might the processes of such historicization be accelerated?”

Badovinac is amongst a group of curators and artists in Central and Eastern Europe that have actively been working to resituate and inscribe a history of art that accommodates artistic production in countries like the former Yugoslavia into “larger” art histories, while at the...

Show More

Zdenka Badovinac became the director of the Moderna galerija in Ljubljana during the wars for Yugoslav succession. In the two and a half decades since, she has been a powerful voice from the so-called “former East” in articulating a position for artists from post-socialist Europe within the contemporary global art infrastructure, where global most often means taking up models instigated in Western museums and exhibition spaces. In 2006 Badovinac curated the exhibition Interrupted Histories, which foregrounded the work of artists from Eastern Europe and the Middle East, and, in her accompanying catalogue essay she asked, “What are the implications of the absence of systematic historicization in spaces outside, or on the margins of, the West? […] How might the processes of such historicization be accelerated?”

Badovinac is amongst a group of curators and artists in Central and Eastern Europe that have actively been working to resituate and inscribe a history of art that accommodates artistic production in countries like the former Yugoslavia into “larger” art histories, while at the same time maintaining a critical stance towards this process.

In her keynote lecture, Badovinac introduces her concept of the “sustainable museum,” and explores possible translocal approaches to exhibition practice from the so-called periphery, nevertheless situated within the neoliberal global network of art museums and biennials.

This seminar is a part of Multiplying Perspectives, in Practice

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This Seminar is part of: Multiplying Perspectives, in Practice