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Liang juhui photo

Liang Juhui 梁钜辉

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Liang Juhui (born in Guangzhou, China, 1959; died 2006) was an artist who lived and worked in Guangzhou, China. Liang was the Art Director of Guanggdong TV in 1982 and graduated from the Print Department of Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts in 1992. Liang was a member of the Southern Artist Salon in the mid-1980s and was a founding member of the Big Tail Elephant Group.

The Big Tail Elephant Group is an artist collective founded in 1990 by Lin Yilin, Chen Shaoxiong, and Liang Juhui and later joined by Xu Tan. The group formed in Guangzhou, China, with an interest in urban development and the rapid transformation of modern cities, Guangzhou being among the earliest cities in China to undergo this shift.

Liang’s work was not medium specific; he worked in installation, sculpture, video, photography, and performance. In his performance One-Hour Game (1996) in the workers’ elevator of a construction site, Liang played video games for an hour. This act is often cited as an example of how Liang and the Big Tail Elephant Group created moments of transcendence of place.

First exhibiting work with Big Tail Elephant in 1991 at the Guangzhou No.1 Worker's Palace, Guangzhou, China, Liang regularly continued to show work with the collective through the 2000s. Select group exhibitions include Another Long March: Chinese Conceptual Art (1997), Breda, The Netherlands; Big Tail Elephant (1998) at Kunsthalle Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Cities on the Move (1998), Vienna, Austria; Transmediale '98, 11th Video Festival (1998) at Podewil, Berlin, Germany; 16th World-Wide Video Festival (1998), Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Inside Out: New Chinese Art (1998) at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, New York, USA; The 4th Gwangju Biennale (2002) in Korea; 50th Venice Biennale (2003) in Venice, Italy; The 2nd Guangzhou Triennial (2005), Guangzhou, China; and IN the 1980s—Wen Pulin Archive of Chinese Avant-Garde Art Exhibition (2009) at the Shanghai Duolun Museum of Modern Art, Shanghai, China.