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Ksenia nouril

Ksenia Nouril

post Editorial Team C-MAP Fellow for Central and Eastern Europe The Museum of Modern Art

Ksenia Nouril is a Contemporary and Modern Art Perspectives (C-MAP) Fellow at MoMA, where she researches and plans programs related to Central and Eastern European art. Previously, she was the Research and Editorial Assistant for the Thomas Walther Collection in the Department of Photography at MoMA, where she co-organized the exhibition Production-Reproduction: The Circulation of Photographic Modernism, 1900-1950. A PhD candidate at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Ksenia is writing her dissertation on the work of contemporary Eastern European artists who actively question and engage with history and historical representations of socialism since 1989. From 2011 to 2016, Ksenia held a Dodge Curatorial Fellowship at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers, where she assisted in the organization of numerous exhibitions of the Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Nonconformist Art from the Soviet Union, including Leonid Sokov: Ironic Objects and Putting a Face to the Name: Artist Portraits from the Dodge Collection. In March 2016, she curated the exhibition Dreamworlds and Catastrophes: Intersections of Art and Technology in the Dodge Collection, which examines the consequences of innovations in science, technology, mathematics, communications, and design on unofficial Soviet art. It will travel in January 2018 to the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut. Ksenia has published in The Calvert Journal and Art Margins.

Photo: Courtesy Scott Rudd

Recent Responses

Ksenia nouril

Posted on 9 Sep

Thanks for your comment, Joseph! I did not have the opportunity to visit Pushniskaya 10 on this trip; however, I have visited St. Petersburg twice before, in 2008 and 2009, when I did visit this art space. Based on that and my conversations with artists, the space has changed a lot over the years. It is not necessarily the same space as it was in the late and post-Soviet times, but it is still a center for art. Now there are so many newer art institutions--both official and start-up--in the city; yet Pushkinsaya 10 is legendary and will always be valuable for its historical contributions to nonconformist and post-Soviet art.

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Thanks for your comment, Joseph! I did not have the opportunity to visit Pushniskaya 10 on this trip; however, I have visited St. Petersburg twice before, in 2008 and 2009, when I did visit this art space. Based on that and my conversations with...

Show more »