Log in to
Email Address
Password
Forgot your password?
Not a member? Sign up now!

Intermedia Japan (1955–1970)

As environmental and media ecologies changed drastically in 1960s urban Japan, how did artists respond to rapid growth and prosperity, and to their byproducts and side effects? In her C-MAP presentation, Miryam Sas revisits the “environments” and “apparatus” that were key to what, in the 1960s, came to be known as intermedia art, practiced by artists such as Matsumoto Toshio, Yuasa Joji, and Akiyama Kuniharu. Sas argues that these artists not only attempted to reflect the structures of mass media in the age of information, but also invented new forms and notions of media that directly engaged the sensibilities that spawned ever-taller buildings, deeper and more expansive underground passageways, and totalizing structures of high-growth capitalism. Recent disasters in Fukushima remind us once again of the fragility of the apparatuses and infrastructures of daily life that the intermedia artists grappled with. Watch Sas’s lecture in this video, and add to the conversation by sharing your thoughts on the presence of media, power, and ecology in artistic practice today.

Author

Ggacedah

Miryam Sas

Professor of Film & Media and Comparative Literature University of California, Berkeley Miryam Sas is a professor of Film & Media and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Her most recent book is Experimental Arts in Postwar... Read more »
Show Less

Intermedia Japan (1955–1970)

As environmental and media ecologies changed drastically in 1960s urban Japan, how did artists respond to rapid growth and prosperity, and to their byproducts and side effects? In her C-MAP presentation, Miryam Sas revisits the “environments” and “apparatus” that were key to what, in the 1960s, came to be known as intermedia art, practiced by artists such as Matsumoto Toshio, Yuasa Joji, and Akiyama Kuniharu. Sas argues that these artists not only attempted to reflect the structures of mass media in the age of information, but also invented new forms and notions of media that directly engaged the sensibilities that spawned ever-taller buildings, deeper and more expansive underground passageways, and totalizing structures of high-growth capitalism. Recent disasters in Fukushima remind us once again of the fragility of the apparatuses and infrastructures of daily life that the intermedia artists grappled with. Watch Sas’s lecture in this video, and add to the conversation by sharing your thoughts on the presence of media, power, and ecology in artistic practice today.

Show More

As environmental and media ecologies changed drastically in 1960s urban Japan, how did artists respond to rapid growth and prosperity, and to their byproducts and side effects? In her C-MAP presentation, Miryam Sas revisits the “environments” and “apparatus” that were key to what, in the 1960s, came to be known as intermedia art, practiced by artists such as Matsumoto Toshio, Yuasa Joji, and Akiyama Kuniharu. Sas argues that these artists not only attempted to reflect the structures of mass media in the age of information, but also invented new forms and notions of media that directly engaged the sensibilities that spawned ever-taller buildings, deeper and more expansive underground passageways, and totalizing structures of high-growth capitalism. Recent disasters in Fukushima remind us once again of the fragility of the apparatuses and infrastructures of daily life that the intermedia artists grappled with. Watch Sas’s lecture in this video, and add to the conversation by sharing your thoughts on the presence of media, power, and ecology in artistic practice today.

Intermedia Japan (1955 – 1970)

Discuss Print

Latest discussion on:
Intermedia Japan (1955–1970)

Sign in or create your account to participate in the discussion.