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This discussion is in response to:
“When a stem breaks the water…”: Sounds of the Sogetsu Ikebana school

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Posted on 6 Sep

From a musical perspective, it's so often just taken for granted that sound is primarily an acoustic phenomenon to be heard and sensed by the ears. But I love these videos because by being silent, they make you realize that sound is also physical, in motion, and material. Katarzyna, have you checked out Emily Thompson's book, The Soundscape of Modernity: Architectural Acoustics and the Culture of Listening in America, 1900-1933? Your piece made me think of her text, where she writes a history of modernity in America by looking at the construction of symphony halls, the soundscape of the modern American city, technologies of electroacoustic sound reproduction, and how all this changed the way people listened, sensed, and came to terms with "modernity."

Awesome videos! I'm so happy that they're finally up on post!

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From a musical perspective, it's so often just taken for granted that sound is primarily an acoustic phenomenon to be heard and sensed by the ears. But I love these videos because by being silent, they make you realize that sound is also physical,...

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Posted on 26 Sep

I liked the idea of attempting to reconcile two contradictory spaces, and also the concept of the two somehow contributing to each other in their own ways despite the difference in their natures. I think that the echoes from the experimental musicians can somehow add an imaginative aspect to the silence of ikebana practice, while ikebana's discipline of refined vitality can give experimental music a new aspect.

Although the traditional image of ikebana's noiselessness may seem to be the polar opposite of the realm of experimental music, I think that the practice of ikebana itself has a certain energy that stems from it's short-lived nature, giving it a somewhat loud and daring aspect. Thus, despite ikebana's aural silence, the loudness of its transient beauty- derived from the fact that it has limited time to flaunt its beauty before wilting- allows it to give off energy that interacts well with the "exuberant noise making" of the space of experimental music.

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I liked the idea of attempting to reconcile two contradictory spaces, and also the concept of the two somehow contributing to each other in their own ways despite the difference in their natures. I think that the echoes from the experimental...

Show more »