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“Picabia Bothers Me Every Morning”: A Conversation with Atul Dodiya

Tyeb Mehta once warned Atul Dodiya against referencing Francis Picabia, who is but one reference on a long and abundant list that includes Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Marcel Duchamp, and surprisingly Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian—although Dodiya has never been an abstract painter. Dodiya also appropriates diverse forms and inspiration from daily life, such as shutters, street posters, graffiti, and the cinema. Beyond having a wide interest in various mediums, genres, and texts that he can utilize for art, he is a critical thinker who stands between historical traditions and the contemporary culture.

This informal conversation with Dodiya took place last March in Mumbai as part of the C-MAP Asia trip. It is the second published interview of the collaboration between C-MAP and Critical Collective. Watch the first interview with Nalini Malani here.

Author

Screen shot 2014 09 30 at 11.51.54 am

Stuart Comer

Chief Curator, Media and Performance Art The Museum of Modern Art Stuart Comer is the Chief Curator of the Department of Media and Performance Art at The Museum of Modern Art, New York. He oversees the department’s program of special... Read more »
Unnamed

Atul Dodiya

artist Atul Dodiya was born in 1959, Mumbai, India. Trained in Mumbai, at Sir JJ School of Art, 1982 and École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, 1991-1992. Atul Dodiya became known in the... Read more »
Gayatri

Gayatri Sinha

Gayatri Sinha is an art critic and curator based in New Delhi. Her primary areas of interest are around the issues of gender and iconography, media, economics and social... Read more »
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“Picabia Bothers Me Every Morning”: A Conversation with Atul Dodiya

Tyeb Mehta once warned Atul Dodiya against referencing Francis Picabia, who is but one reference on a long and abundant list that includes Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Marcel Duchamp, and surprisingly Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian—although Dodiya has never been an abstract painter. Dodiya also appropriates diverse forms and inspiration from daily life, such as shutters, street posters, graffiti, and the cinema. Beyond having a wide interest in various mediums, genres, and texts that he can utilize for art, he is a critical thinker who stands between historical traditions and the contemporary culture.

This informal conversation with Dodiya took place last March in Mumbai as part of the C-MAP Asia trip. It is the second published interview of the collaboration between C-MAP and Critical Collective. Watch the first interview with Nalini Malani here.

Show More

Tyeb Mehta once warned Atul Dodiya against referencing Francis Picabia, who is but one reference on a long and abundant list that includes Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Marcel Duchamp, and surprisingly Kazimir Malevich and Piet Mondrian—although Dodiya has never been an abstract painter. Dodiya also appropriates diverse forms and inspiration from daily life, such as shutters, street posters, graffiti, and the cinema. Beyond having a wide interest in various mediums, genres, and texts that he can utilize for art, he is a critical thinker who stands between historical traditions and the contemporary culture.

This informal conversation with Dodiya took place last March in Mumbai as part of the C-MAP Asia trip. It is the second published interview of the collaboration between C-MAP and Critical Collective. Watch the first interview with Nalini Malani here.

Part 1: Gandhi Was the First Conceptual Artist

Part 2: Painting in a Digital Age

Part 3: Picabia Bothers Me Every Morning

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“Picabia Bothers Me Every Morning”: A Conversation with Atul Dodiya

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Picabia Bothers Me Too

Posted on 9 Oct

The name Picabia caught my eye -- I was delighted to have it lead me to this great encounter with Atul Dodiya and his work!

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The name Picabia caught my eye -- I was delighted to have it lead me to this great encounter with Atul Dodiya and his work!

Show more »