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Huang Yong Ping on His Autobiographical Long Scroll in MoMA's Collection

Huang Yong Ping talks about how the exhibition Magiciens de la terre (1989) in Paris changed his artistic practices and life trajectory in this conversation with Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, and Yu-Chieh Li, Andrew W. Mellon C-MAP Fellow, at Le Hangar à Bananes gallery in Nantes, France, in June 2014.

Huang identifies Reptile (1989), a work he presented at Magiciens de la terre, as his first room-size installation. It evolved from his earlier experiments in which he washed books in a washing machine and his strategic juxtapositions of Eastern and Western literary and philosophical traditions. By happenstance, he was still in Paris when the Tiananmen Square massacre took place, a turn of events that led him to become a permanent “refugee” and frequent participant in international exhibitions.

Huang also talks about Long Scroll (2001), a drawing in MoMA’s collection that represents various moments in his life and oeuvre, as well as his Roulette series, which includes several roulettes that he designed to “teach” himself to make art through chance.

The second part of this conversation, in which Huang discusses his Dadaist practices in the 1980s and 1990s, will be published in May 2015.

Author

Yuchieh li

Yu-Chieh Li

Former Andrew W. Mellon C-MAP Fellow at The Museum of Modern Art Yu-Chieh Li was the Andrew W. Mellon C-MAP Fellow for the C-MAP Asia group from October 2013 to September 2015. At the Museum, she was a co-editor of post and organized... Read more »
Suzuki headshot

Sarah Suzuki

Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints The Museum of Modern Art Sarah Suzuki is Curator of Drawings and Prints at the Museum of Modern Art. At MoMA, Ms. Suzuki’s exhibitions include Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second... Read more »
Huang yongping profile photo

Huang Yong Ping 黄永砯

Artist Huang Yong Ping (born in Xiamen, China, 1954) is an artist who lives and works in Paris. Huang graduated from the Fine Arts Academy of Zhejiang, Zhejiang, China (1989).... Read more »
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Huang Yong Ping on His Autobiographical Long Scroll in MoMA's Collection

Huang Yong Ping talks about how the exhibition Magiciens de la terre (1989) in Paris changed his artistic practices and life trajectory in this conversation with Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, and Yu-Chieh Li, Andrew W. Mellon C-MAP Fellow, at Le Hangar à Bananes gallery in Nantes, France, in June 2014.

Huang identifies Reptile (1989), a work he presented at Magiciens de la terre, as his first room-size installation. It evolved from his earlier experiments in which he washed books in a washing machine and his strategic juxtapositions of Eastern and Western literary and philosophical traditions. By happenstance, he was still in Paris when the Tiananmen Square massacre took place, a turn of events that led him to become a permanent “refugee” and frequent participant in international exhibitions.

Huang also talks about Long Scroll (2001), a drawing in MoMA’s collection that represents various moments in his life and oeuvre, as well as his Roulette series, which includes several roulettes that he designed to “teach” himself to make art through chance.

The...

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Huang Yong Ping talks about how the exhibition Magiciens de la terre (1989) in Paris changed his artistic practices and life trajectory in this conversation with Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator of Drawings and Prints, and Yu-Chieh Li, Andrew W. Mellon C-MAP Fellow, at Le Hangar à Bananes gallery in Nantes, France, in June 2014.

Huang identifies Reptile (1989), a work he presented at Magiciens de la terre, as his first room-size installation. It evolved from his earlier experiments in which he washed books in a washing machine and his strategic juxtapositions of Eastern and Western literary and philosophical traditions. By happenstance, he was still in Paris when the Tiananmen Square massacre took place, a turn of events that led him to become a permanent “refugee” and frequent participant in international exhibitions.

Huang also talks about Long Scroll (2001), a drawing in MoMA’s collection that represents various moments in his life and oeuvre, as well as his Roulette series, which includes several roulettes that he designed to “teach” himself to make art through chance.

The second part of this conversation, in which Huang discusses his Dadaist practices in the 1980s and 1990s, will be published in May 2015.

A Conversation with Huang Yong Ping, Part I

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