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Projection Installations in Japan, 1960s–1970s

Although postwar Japanese avant-garde art is considered to have ended in the year 1970, Julian Ross contends that projection installations in the 1970s took on many of its characteristics, namely, an engagement with the concepts of "environment," "intermedia," and "display." These critical concepts were not merely debated in Tokyo, but were also reflected in artists’ practices in Kyoto and Osaka. Ross discusses case studies, including film installations presented in the exhibition Equivalent Cinema (Kyoto, 1972) and other intermedia pieces that involved projection, kinetic art, synthesis art, video, film, sound, etc., in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Midori Yoshimoto and Noam Elcott were the respondents at this C-MAP Seminar. Their comments shed light on discourses about environmental art, media, and the avant-garde. Join this conversation by clicking on “discuss.”

Author

Elcott noam

Noam M. Elcott

Assistant Professor, Modern and Contemporary Art and Media Columbia University, Department of Art History and Archeology Noam M. Elcott writes and teaches the history of modern art and media in Europe and North America, with an emphasis on interwar art, photography, and film. He is an editor... Read more »
Julespass

Julian Ross

Julian Ross is a researcher, curator and writer based in Amsterdam. Recently completing his PhD thesis on 1960s Japanese expanded cinema at the University of Leeds, he has... Read more »
Yoshimoto 2013portrait

Midori Yoshimoto

Associate Professor of Art History and Gallery Director New Jersey City University Midori Yoshimoto is associate professor of art history and gallery director at New Jersey City University with extensive curatorial background. While earning her Ph.D. at... Read more »
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Projection Installations in Japan, 1960s–1970s

Although postwar Japanese avant-garde art is considered to have ended in the year 1970, Julian Ross contends that projection installations in the 1970s took on many of its characteristics, namely, an engagement with the concepts of "environment," "intermedia," and "display." These critical concepts were not merely debated in Tokyo, but were also reflected in artists’ practices in Kyoto and Osaka. Ross discusses case studies, including film installations presented in the exhibition Equivalent Cinema (Kyoto, 1972) and other intermedia pieces that involved projection, kinetic art, synthesis art, video, film, sound, etc., in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Midori Yoshimoto and Noam Elcott were the respondents at this C-MAP Seminar. Their comments shed light on discourses about environmental art, media, and the avant-garde. Join this conversation by clicking on “discuss.”

Show More

Although postwar Japanese avant-garde art is considered to have ended in the year 1970, Julian Ross contends that projection installations in the 1970s took on many of its characteristics, namely, an engagement with the concepts of "environment," "intermedia," and "display." These critical concepts were not merely debated in Tokyo, but were also reflected in artists’ practices in Kyoto and Osaka. Ross discusses case studies, including film installations presented in the exhibition Equivalent Cinema (Kyoto, 1972) and other intermedia pieces that involved projection, kinetic art, synthesis art, video, film, sound, etc., in the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Midori Yoshimoto and Noam Elcott were the respondents at this C-MAP Seminar. Their comments shed light on discourses about environmental art, media, and the avant-garde. Join this conversation by clicking on “discuss.”

Projection Installations in Japan, 1960s–1970s, Part I

Projection Installations in Japan, 1960s–1970s, Part II

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Projection Installations in Japan, 1960s–1970s

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