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Istanbul with Superpool

We cannot always quantify change; is Istanbul changing very fast? ... too fast? To document and archive in a place that has a habit of describing itself as "in flux" is of immense importance; we rely on the stories we record and tell to create a collective memory.

We thank the individuals and institutions that shared their recordings with us.

In this growing report for post, Superpool surveys urban developments in Istanbul. To keep updated with future instalments, select the 'Follow' tab to the right of your screen. This content was commissioned as part of the research for the 2014 MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth, Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities, curated by Pedro Gadanho (Curator, Architecture and Design).

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Superpool.post.at.moma

SUPERPOOL ‏

Selva Gürdoğan, Architect (born 1979, Turkey. 2003 graduate from Sci-Arc, USA) and Gregers Tang Thomsen, Architect (born 1974, Denmark. 2003 graduate from Aarhus School of... Read more »
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Istanbul with Superpool

We cannot always quantify change; is Istanbul changing very fast? ... too fast? To document and archive in a place that has a habit of describing itself as "in flux" is of immense importance; we rely on the stories we record and tell to create a collective memory.

We thank the individuals and institutions that shared their recordings with us.

In this growing report for post, Superpool surveys urban developments in Istanbul. To keep updated with future instalments, select the 'Follow' tab to the right of your screen. This content was commissioned as part of the research for the 2014 MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth, Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities, curated by Pedro Gadanho (Curator, Architecture and Design).

Show More

We cannot always quantify change; is Istanbul changing very fast? ... too fast? To document and archive in a place that has a habit of describing itself as "in flux" is of immense importance; we rely on the stories we record and tell to create a collective memory.

We thank the individuals and institutions that shared their recordings with us.

In this growing report for post, Superpool surveys urban developments in Istanbul. To keep updated with future instalments, select the 'Follow' tab to the right of your screen. This content was commissioned as part of the research for the 2014 MoMA exhibition Uneven Growth, Tactical Urbanisms for Expanding Megacities, curated by Pedro Gadanho (Curator, Architecture and Design).

Browse by:

1. Shell

In his series Shell, Turkish photographer Serkan Taycan examines Istanbul's rapid and constant changes by focusing on the periphery of the city. The main theme of his work is the ever-changing relationship between urban and rural spaces, and the people who are affected by these processes of transformation. Shell captures a transition point in history — the realization that we should start to examine cities with a new perspective.

Taycan looks at the impact of the massive growth of the city's population and questions the viability of the new living spaces presented to us. The mass migration toward Istanbul since the 1950s has exposed the city to unplanned urbanization; a constant need for new buildings to accommodate the population has transformed the city periphery into a huge construction site. This transformation can be witnessed at the urban border in its most vulnerable and raw state, where the scene is far from optimistic. Environmental sustainability is not taken into account, and new areas of development are far from the familiar dynamics of the city. The carved mine sites, which provide the origins of construction material, mark the wounds of the city. Serkan Taycan represents Istanbul as a dystopia stuck in this vicious cycle of construction, deconstruction, and reconstruction. He combines different endpoints of the city in diptychs and triptychs merging time and space. In this way, his photographs become personal interventions into the topography of these places and propose alternatives for the current city image.

GUP Magazine: http://www.gupmagazine.com/

www.serkantaycan.com

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2. Not a farewell at all

Inonu Stadium, demolished in the summer of 2013, was one of Turkey’s oldest sports stadiums and is an integral part of the country's sports history. Home to the Besiktas soccer club, one of Turkey’s biggest soccer teams, the stadium opened on November 27, 1947 with a match against AIK Solna (Sweden). The Democratic Party changed its name to Mithatpasa Stadium in 1952; later, it was known as Dolmabahce Stadium; and then in 1973 it regained its original name. In 2009, The Times ranked it fourth among the world’s ten most beautiful stadiums. Plans to renovate the stadium were approved by the Council of Monuments in May 2013. The match between Besiktas and Genclerbirligi on May 11, 2013, was the last to be played in the original Inonu...

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Inonu Stadium, demolished in the summer of 2013, was one of Turkey’s oldest sports stadiums and is an integral part of the country's sports history. Home to the Besiktas soccer club, one of Turkey’s biggest soccer teams, the stadium opened on November 27, 1947 with a match against AIK Solna (Sweden). The Democratic Party changed its name to Mithatpasa Stadium in 1952; later, it was known as Dolmabahce Stadium; and then in 1973 it regained its original name. In 2009, The Times ranked it fourth among the world’s ten most beautiful stadiums. Plans to renovate the stadium were approved by the Council of Monuments in May 2013. The match between Besiktas and Genclerbirligi on May 11, 2013, was the last to be played in the original Inonu Stadium.

The stadium served as a home for fans of the local team. Until recently, the Besiktas club had resisted pressure to become financially oriented, while other teams in the country went about rebuilding their stadiums. However, this year the club approved the construction of a larger, modern stadium with more seats and luxurious private rooms. Inonu Stadium was demolished in July, and the site is now being prepared for construction. Fans fear that the state will appropriate the land because of its desirable location in the center of Istanbul near the Bosphorus strait and the Dolmabahçe Palace. In recent years, the cultural life of Istanbul has been affected by the loss of movie theaters, cafes, and bookstores—sites that hold public memories—which have been razed and replaced by shopping malls. With increasing real estate speculation in the city, there are fears that at the last minute the stadium's land could be designated for other uses, as when the government attempted to situate a shopping mall and hotel in Gezi Park. The Gezi protest started two weeks after the last game in Inonu Stadium, and the Besikats fan club Carsi was one of the leading groups involved in saving the park.

This video documents the last chance to be there, to take a piece back home (chairs, field, grass...), to talk about memories and say goodbye. As filmmakers, photographers and Besiktas fans, members of the NARPhotos Collective wished to bear witness to this.

NARphotos: www.narphotos.net

3. Istanbul Eats

First started as a blog in 2009 by Americans Ansel Mullins and Yigal Schleifer, Istanbul Eats was created with a dual purpose. On the most basic level, the blog was designed to be a guide that helps visitors to Istanbul find their way to the city's best local, authentic, and traditional restaurants and food makers, the kinds of places that are often very hard to find on one's own. On a deeper level, though, Istanbul Eats was created to help celebrate, support, and preserve these types of places, many of them small-scale, family-run businesses, by introducing them to a new audience—both foreign and domestic.

In a rapidly changing and economically dynamic city like Istanbul, many of these traditional food spots were finding themselves unable to compete and often left behind. Istanbul Eats tries to remind those who live in Istanbul and, more importantly, those who make decisions about the city's future, that culinary tradition and those who uphold it are as essential a part of a city's fabric as new roads, buildings, and infrastructure projects.

Read the reviews here:
Şahin Lokantası: Edible Complex
Çakmak: Breakfast of Şampiyons
Özbek Sofrası: A Higher Plov

4. BAS Center for Artists’ Books and Publications

Since 2006, artist Banu Cennetoğlu has been running the space BAS in Istanbul, where local and international artists’ books and publications are collected, displayed and produced. With a permanent display area in the space, the aim is to create an awareness of the medium and to encourage the public to explore printed matter.

Between 2006 and 2009, BAS published Bent, a series of artists’ books co-edited by Banu Cennetoğlu and Philippine Hoegen. To support a local production and generate a discussion on the context of bookworks, Bent deliberately focused on collaborations with artists from Turkey and created titles by 4 artists and 1 artist collective. Philippine moved to Brussels in 2011, and the production of the Bent series was ceased, but projects that resulted from or relate to the project still continue.

In 2007, the hugely successful An Interrupted History of Punk and Underground Resources in Turkey 1978-1999, edited by Sezgin Boynik and Tolga Güldallı, was published by BAS.

Since December 2009, a series of talks and archival exhibitions has been taking place at BAS. In September 2013, an exhibition of Old News archive (2004- ) was followed by a talk by its founder, curator Jacob Fabricius.

www.b-a-s.info

Sanatçı Kitabı by Daniel Knorr

İstanbul - Ömer’in Uçurtması (Istanbul - Ömer's kite)

Bent 005: KILAVUZ by Atıl Kunst

5. Zumbara: Istanbul-based time-banking

Zumbara is a platform where groups and individuals can pool and trade experiences and skills, using time instead of money as the unit of currency based on the principle, “We have what we need if we use what we have”. To give an example, Mary shows how to make his own web page to David for 2 hours, earns 2 hour in return, spends 1 hour on having her washing machine fixed and the other hour by having her wedding playlist organized by someone else.

While time banking is being practiced in many countries to strengthen local communities, Zumbara brings the combination of this system with a social network: Time Bank 2.0. Zumbara aims to foster a two-sided gift culture:

“To begin with, each of us has a unique gift, which seeks continuously to...

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Zumbara is a platform where groups and individuals can pool and trade experiences and skills, using time instead of money as the unit of currency based on the principle, “We have what we need if we use what we have”. To give an example, Mary shows how to make his own web page to David for 2 hours, earns 2 hour in return, spends 1 hour on having her washing machine fixed and the other hour by having her wedding playlist organized by someone else.

While time banking is being practiced in many countries to strengthen local communities, Zumbara brings the combination of this system with a social network: Time Bank 2.0. Zumbara aims to foster a two-sided gift culture:

“To begin with, each of us has a unique gift, which seeks continuously to be realized and expressed. When given the chance, this gift flows naturally and that which we give somehow comes back to us. Secondly, when we share our gifts with others, we experience a feeling of unity. Thanks to the social technologies that exist in today’s world, the gift economy and sharing culture is being practiced – every day – by huge numbers of people, resulting in major changes in behavior patterns … Our goal is to prompt people to question whether they need to be money dependent. We offer a glimpse into a world where sharing and collaboration has the potential to create self-sufficient communities.

In monthly events, Zumbara asks people to bring food that they cook, things (e.g., clothes, books), and services/expertise that they want to share with others. Together, they form an open bazaar, where people organize yoga classes, make music, and talk about their experiences in film, sports etc. The content of every gathering is a total surprise but through each, people connect in meaningful ways.

Zumbara was founded by Meltem Şendağ and Ayşegül Güzel.

http://www.zumbara.com/en/

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Made in Şişhane

Posted on 11 Mar

Made in Şişhane Project as a social and activist project organizes creative actions in order to safeguard the craft neighbourhoods in İstanbul versus the top down transformation processes since 2006.

The project which is founded by architect-designer Aslı Kıyak İngin, asks: How can design have a positive role in the sustainable development of a craft neighbourhood? What kind of potentiality do these neighbourhoods have for the designers and creative actors?

The Project attempts to show that such areas can be situated as an experiential spaces open to creativity, and enriches the craft networks with the participation of designers, artists, architects, and academia, culture and tourism actors. There has been organized several workshops, exhibitions, talks, blogs, documentary films and a book to search and enlarge the project questions. The project emphasizes not only the product but the process, the stories and the experiences, in short, the workshops and the craft network that are less visible and the least known. Made in Şişhane project is invited to the first İstanbul Design Biennial with URBZ by Joseph Grima with a title of Crafting Neighbourhood-Unmediated Design, and also organized a workshop named More than Design with Design Quartier Ehrenfeld during the Biennial. Made in Şişhane book on Istanbul, small- scale production and design printed in November 2011 by the support of Consulate-General of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

The project mainly focuses to Sishane District which is one of the craft neighbourhoods is a 100 year old lighting production and commerce centre of Istanbul. The production in the neighbourhood is mostly based on artisanship which is specialized one of whole range of different materials and techniques like metal turner, wire frame, wood, acrylic, lampshade, neon, etc. Together they form one big production network with multi-optional and flexible production and create an eco-system that is unique to that location. Despite its historicality, continuity and expertise in crafts and as a part of the intangible cultural heritage, the artisan based production is currently facing the threat of evacuation by new master plans, speed gentrification process, lack of adaptation to new economical systems. Made in Şişhane Project is developed because of these threats and in order to demonstrate that such small scale production areas within cities have different and new potentials today and to offer them sustainability.

Photo_2_img_0427harsiv
Photograph Archive of Galata Fotografhanesi Academy of Photography.
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Photograph Archive of Galata Fotografhanesi Academy of Photography.
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Photography: Arif Yaman.
Photo_4_mis_arifyaman002
Photography: Arif Yaman.
Photo_5_mis_arifyaman007
Photography: Arif Yaman.
Photo_6_mis_arifyaman023-_harunlar-gabi_usta
Photography: Arif Yaman.
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Photography: Anıl Çizmecioğlu
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Photography: Arif Yaman.
Photo_9_img_0365harsiv
Photograph Archive of Galata Fotografhanesi Academy of Photography.
Photo_10_kumbarac%c4%b1_ah%c5%9fap_an%c4%b1l_4
Photography: Anıl Çizmecioğlu
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Photography: Arif Yaman..
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Photography: Arif Yaman.
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Photography: Deniz Pekkıyıcı
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Photography: Aslı Kıyak İngin.
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Photography: Aslı Kıyak İngin.

http://www.madeinsishane.net

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Made-in-sishane/161092357325738

http://morethandesignist.wordpress.com

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Made in Şişhane Project as a social and activist project organizes creative actions in order to safeguard the craft neighbourhoods in İstanbul versus the top down transformation processes since 2006.

Show more »